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The Inspiration behind La Prairie’s New Store Design

Jun 2, 2017

Swiss Contemporary Architecture is much admired for both its innovation and sophisticated elegance. The founding in 1928 of the International Congresses of Modern Architecture in Switzerland, along with the groundbreaking work of Swiss-born modern architects, such as Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, known as Le Corbusier, introduced Swiss Contemporary architecture to the world. At the forefront of the modern architecture movement, it embodies the purity, precision and aesthetic harmony inherent to Switzerland. 

Since the 1990s, the minimalist buildings of Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron have been consistently creating a sensation on the international architecture scene. One of their most celebrated projects involved converting the Bankside Power Station in London into the new home of the Tate Modern, one of the largest museums of modern and contemporary art in the world.

Another artistic movement inspired by the dramatic landscapes found in Switzerland, the school of Land Art is a conceptual approach from the 1960s rooted in nature — one in which landscape and the work of art are inextricably linked. To wit, this month, the city of Grindelwald, Switzerland will host the LandArt Festival, during which 11 international teams will create sculptures and other works in the surrounding natural environment, using only natural and locally sourced materials.

In designing its new store concept, La Prairie took inspiration from both the sleek Swiss Contemporary Architecture for its store design and the organic Land Art for its Visual Merchandising. Further celebrating the intrinsic link to artistic movements, the store is adorned with commissioned modern sculptures representing each of the key skincare collections. The entire space echoes contemporary aesthetic movements through a pristine elegance pays homage to the beauty and timelessness of the birthplace of La Prairie.

Architecture, Herzog & de Meuron, Land Art, Contemporary Art

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An Audacious Year at Art Basel

Jun 19, 2017

In 1970, three passionate and determined Basel gallerists — Ernst Beyeler, Trudi Bruckner and Balz Hilt — staged an international art exhibition. It was an immediate sensation, bringing together exceptional artwork from around the world to Switzerland. In that inaugural show, more than 16,000 enthusiasts attended to see art from 90 galleries and 30 publishers representing 10 countries.

Art Basel is now one of the world's major art shows for modern and contemporary works, with unique shows also hosted in Miami Beach and Hong Kong.

Basel continues to be the premier contemporary art fair, and last week nearly 300 of the world's leading galleries descended on the Swiss cultural capital to showcase paintings, drawings, sculpture, installations, prints, photography, video and digital art by more than 4,000 artists. The galleries represented 35 countries and six continents.

This year, amidst the talks, performances and soirées, visitors were drawn to the beating heart of the fair — the galleries that took over the Messeplatz and offered an array of raw and beautiful pieces, some of which boldly reflected the world’s current cultural and political climate.

There was a palpable frisson of excitement as art connoisseurs and buyers from around the world viewed work by such legends as Picasso, Miró and Schiele, along with awe-inspiring contemporary artists at the pinnacle of their careers. These included Swiss artist Urs Fischer who reinvented Rodin’s The Kiss with oil-based modelling clay and invited visitors to interact with it. They eagerly pulled off pieces and inscribed their names with it across on the walls.

Emerging artists were also celebrated. The Baloise Art Prize, which is awarded annually to two young artists, went to America’s Sam Pulitzer and Martha Atienza from the Philippines. Mr. Pulitzer exhibited a series of transparent corridors mounted with playful drawings in coloured pencil inspired by advertising, clip art and popular culture. Ms. Atienza’s video installation featured a parade of characters from one of the Philippines’ oldest festivals, which she shot walking across a seabed as a critical and humorous take not only on the state of society in her home country, but also on the threat of climate change.

Perhaps the most spellbinding exhibits were the enormous installations in the “Unlimited” section, such as Subodh Gupta’s Cooking the World, which featured a shelter made from cooking utensils suspended from the ceiling on fishing lines. Inside, the artist cooked Indian food for those lucky enough to have secured a ticket for the live performance. The sharing of food served as a gesture of inclusion and acceptance.

Sue Williamson’s large-scale installation featuring bottles each hand-engraved with information about a different slave from the 16th to the 19th century added to the mesmerising spectacle.

Camilla Brown, 63, from Lausanne, who has been attending the fair for the past 28 years, said: “Every year Art Basel gets better and better, and this year is absolutely astonishing. There’s super strong energy. Everyone can feel it.

In her mind, this was Art Basel’s strongest year.

All these fantastic pieces give you so many emotions,” said Ms. Brown. “The visitors are amazing too. It’s quite a show to sit and watch them – they’re a performance in themselves. I’ve been here for three days and you get a bit drunk on all the emotions you feel from everything you see.

And galleries were not the only ones showcasing electric works of art this year.

In a first-of-its-kind partnership, La Prairie — whose innovative spirit and passion for audacity mirrors the world of contemporary art — partnered with Art Basel to invite guests inside its rarefied world of timeless beauty.

Part of the fair’s VIP Lounge was transformed into a transcendental La Prairie universe, where guests enjoyed customised treatments next to an audacious installation by Paul Coudamy, who was commissioned to celebrate the 30th anniversary of  the brand’s iconic Skin Caviar.

For his steel sculpture, entitled Living Cells, the French architect and artist uses volume to masterfully interpret La Prairie’s latest groundbreaking innovation, Skin Caviar Absolute Filler.

Inspired by the Weaire-Phelan structure, a mathematical formula of a complex three-dimensional form representing foam bubbles of equal size, Living Cells is comprised of lustrous black, magnetised marbles — reminiscent of caviar, another nod to its muse. The installation’s captivating form and spiral structure seemed to be in constant flux, transcending its surroundings and striking awe amongst viewers.

The installation echoed the culmination of the worlds of art and science seen throughout Art Basel this year.

Art Basel, art, skincare, Basel, Paul Coudamy, Living Cells, Skin Caviar Absolute Filler

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Art Basel and La Prairie: an Inspired Partnership

Mar 22, 2017

Art Basel, the renowned art exhibition held in Basel, Switzerland, is the world's premier art show for modern and contemporary works. The organisation also holds shows in Miami Beach and Hong Kong. Defined by its host city and region, each show is unique – a uniqueness reflected in its participating galleries, the artworks presented, as well as the content of parallel programming produced in collaboration with local institutional partners.

La Prairie will partner with Art Basel in a first-of-its-kind partnership from June 12-19, 2017. As part of this exciting initiative, La Prairie will be present in Art Basel’s VIP Lounge throughout the duration of the fair, where visitors will have the opportunity to experience the La Prairie universe and enjoy customised La Prairie treatments.

Using rare, precious ingredients, La Prairie continues to break the codes of luxury skincare. Founded on the belief that the scientist’s creative process is akin to that of the artist, every La Prairie formulation begins with an audacious vision.

“We are very excited about the partnership between La Prairie and Art Basel, which we feel perfectly represents our quest for timeless beauty and our passion for audacity,” said Patrick Rasquinet, President and CEO of La Prairie Group. “Indeed, from the painstaking research behind our scientific breakthroughs to the opulent formulations that envelop the senses, from the jewel-like packaging to the high-touch service, art is not just what La Prairie is, it is what we do,” he added.

That innovative spirit is mirrored in the world of contemporary art. “Art Basel gathers influencers from the international artistic community who seek to push the envelope of what is possible, which is why we feel a partnership with La Prairie is reflective of Art Basel’s values,” said Marc Spiegler, Global Director of Art Basel.

In addition to establishing the partnership with Art Basel in 2017, La Prairie will also mark the 30th anniversary of its iconic Skin Caviar. To celebrate the occasion, La Prairie plans to collaborate on an artistic installation with a select group of contemporary artists. Check this space for updates. 

Keywords: Art, Art Basel, Artists, Audacious, Luxury, Innovation, Contemporary Art

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The Art of Travelling Well

Jul 13, 2017

Travelling well involves much more than luxury destinations and five star amenities. It is an attitude — one that suggests a certain confidence that comes only from being a citizen of the world.

Arriving at a destination with an air of tranquil elegance, despite the usual pitfalls of international travel — delays, displaced luggage and fatigue — means seeking out the most innovative travel solutions to ensure a smooth, sophisticated journey.

To answer to the needs of the savvy traveller, luxury luggage brands are increasingly combining the high-end materials and precise craftsmanship clients expect with cutting-edge elements, such as integrated GPS tracking, USB chargers, remote auto-lock mechanisms and self-weighing technology, converting stylish suitcases into multi-faceted travel accessories.

Eschewing the standard issue complimentary amenities found on long-haul flights, seasoned travellers look to luxury brands to find lightweight, easy-to-pack essentials to help make long-haul flights more comfortable. Travel sets that include an elegant cashmere wrap, soft organic cotton slippers, silk eye masks and noise-cancelling headphones can go a long way to making any flight a restorative experience.

Travelling well also means taking advantage of the journey to rejuvenate, replenish and refresh the skin. Innovative formulas that combine several targeted actions in a single product mean fewer items in the vanity case. Clever locking mechanisms on dispensers ensure products arrive at their destination without spilling. Climate-activated moisturisers and deeply nourishing masks keep the dehydrating effects of pressurised cabins at bay, while delicately scented formulations and rich textures combine ensure a moment of indulgence — even at 30,000 feet.

Travel in style, Luxury, Travel, Luxury destination, Luxury luggage, Light packing, Travel smart

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The Art of Caviar

Jul 14, 2017

Caviar has long been a symbol of decadence. Glinting like black pearls, it belongs to a rarified world of luxury and indulgence. 

La Prairie turned to this precious ingredient for its unique restorative powers to launch its celebrated Skin Caviar Collection 30 years ago. It was an audacious move for the brand, which was the first to use the rare potency of caviar in skincare products.

To mark the 30th anniversary of the iconic Skin Caviar, La Prairie has collaborated with a group of equally audacious contemporary artists to produce an exhibition that masterfully evokes the world of caviar.

Paul Coudamy’s Living Cells, which was unveiled at Art Basel this year [link to article], is a geometric structure of lacquered steel and magnets, defined through the mathematical formula known as Weaire-Phelan. Shiny black magnetised marbles – reminiscent of caviar – colonise the structure in clusters. The volume of the piece is in constant flux as the marbles can be moved, creating new, unique forms.

Solid Frequencies, a second work by Mr Coudamy, takes its cue from the Kundt Tube, a scientific device that displays sound waves in an air-filled, transparent tube. It features a large black form pierced by a glass tube filled with small marbles, inspired by the beads of La Prairie’s Skin Caviar. When the piece is touched, the marbles move, generating three-dimensional shapes that flow back and forth through the tube following the hand’s movement.

Moving Pixel, an installation by Bonjour Lab, was inspired by the spectacular lifting effect of La Prairie’s Skin Caviar Liquid Lift. The golden beads form a silhouette frozen in time and space for a brief moment, resisting both time and gravity.

Cinq Fruits celebrates La Prairie’s eternal quest for indulgence and timeless beauty with photographs evoking the iconic Skin Caviar Luxe Cream and Luxe Cream Sheer while showcasing the brand’s artistic sensibilities.

And finally, an audiovisual installation by TremensS echoes the way La Prairie uses steam distillation to capture Caviar Water, which is used in Skin Caviar Essence-in-Lotion. The artwork is housed in a pitch-black room where a laser hits a vertical monolith. Four video-projectors cast abstract visuals that interact with the laser, while sound heightens the immersive experience. 

The five valiant art installations will travel to Paris, New York, Hong Kong and Shanghai where visitors will witness art and science coming together in an inspiring and daring union. 

Paul Coudamy, Bonjour Lab, Cinq Fruits, TremensS, Paris, Art, Exhibition, Art of Caviar, Contemporary Art

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